Single Stroke Seven

Learn To Play The Single Stroke Seven Drum Rudiment!

The single stroke seven was not featured in the standard 26 American drum rudiments, but was one of the 14 drum rudiments that were added to the 26 drum rudiments in 1984 by the Percussive Arts Society. This led to the formation of the 40 international drum rudiments.

Single Stroke Seven

The single stroke seven is a single stroke four with three extra notes. Thus, while with the single stroke four you played four consecutive and alternating single strokes, with the single stroke seven you play seven. The single stroke seven is usually played as 8th note triplets or as 16th note triplets. Take a look at the free drum lessons on the single stroke roll and the single stroke four drum rudiments before going any further with this one. Knowing how to accurately play the single stroke roll and the single stroke four drum rudiments will enhance the way you learn the material in this free drum lesson.

Since the single stroke seven does not alternate within itself, practice leading with both hands. Strive for playing consistent sounding strokes. Once you can play a solid single stroke seven on a single surface, move on and use the following drum beats and drum fills to learn how to apply the single stroke seven to the drum set.

Exercise #1 is an 8th note triplet half-time drum beat. Start by playing the single stroke seven on the hi-hat between counts 1 and 3. Then, move the seventh stroke to the snare drum. Finally, add the bass drum on count 1 and the floor tom on count 4.

Single Stroke Seven #1

The rhythmic pattern in this exercise is the same one as that of exercise #1; the only thing that changes here is the stroke orchestration. Since this is still an 8th note triplet half-time drum beat, the seventh stroke of the single stroke seven is kept on the snare drum. The initial six strokes of the single stroke seven are scattered between the hi-hat and the bow of the ride cymbal, and the bell of the ride cymbal replaces the floor tom on count 4. Changing the stroke orchestration is a great way of coming up with new ideas from pre-existing ones. Use this kind of tactic with all the drum beats and drum fills in this website, for coming up with new patterns of your own.

Single Stroke Seven #2

Exercise #3 is an 8th note triplet drum fill. This drum fill features a single stroke seven between counts 1 and 3, and a single stroke four between count 4 and count 1 on the following measure – the forth stroke is on count 1. Going from the hi-tom to the mid-tom may give you some headaches. You'll have to quickly move the right hand out of the way of the left hand, as the left hand makes way to the mid-tom to hit it on count 2, to avoid clicking your sticks, hitting rims or worst, your own hand.

Practicing this drum fill slowly at first, will get you used to making a clean transition between the hi-tom and the mid-tom. Leading this drum fill with the left hand instead is also a great way of avoiding the issue we've discussed.

Single Stroke Seven #3

Exercise #4 has the same rhythmic pattern as exercise #3. It features a single stroke seven between counts 1 and 3, and a single stroke four between count 4 and count 1 on the following measure. Focus on memorizing the hand sequence first. Once you can play the drum fill accurately, add a metronome in and work on playing consistent sounding and evenly spaced strokes.

Single Stroke Seven #4

Once you're able to play the single stroke seven and the exercises herein accurately, you can move on to further expand your knowledge on the drum rudiments. We encourage to check the free drum lessons on the double stroke roll and the multiple bounce roll next.