Single Dragadiddle

Learn To Play The Single Dragadiddle Drum Rudiment!

The single dragadiddle is very similar to the single paradiddle. Their main difference resides on the first note. The single dragadiddle starts with a 32nd note bounced double stroke instead of with a 16th note single stroke like the single paradiddle does. Taking a look at the sheet music below, you can see that the double stroke is represented with a diagonal line on the note stems.

Single Dragadiddle

You can count the single dragadiddle as 16th notes or as you would the single paradiddle: RR(drag or par) L(a) R(did) R(dle) LL(drag or par) R(a) L(did) L(dle). It's essential for you to learn how to play the drag ruff and the single paradiddle before you do the single dragadiddle. Doing so will speed up your learning process.

Exercise #1 is a 32nd note drum beat. The single dragadiddle is scattered between the hi-hat and the snare drum. This pattern is pretty much like beat #1 on the free drum lesson on the single paradiddle. The only differences you'll find here are the doubles played on the hi-hat on counts 1 and 3, and on the snare drum on counts 2 and 4.

Single Dragadiddle #1

Exercise #2 is another 32nd note drum beat. This pattern is very similar to exercise #2 in the free drum lesson on the single paradiddle. Start by playing that pattern. Then, remove the bass drum strokes on counts 2 and 4. Move the hand stroke on counts 1 and 3 to the hi-tom. Once you have all of these components mastered, double the hand strokes on each quarter note.

Single Dragadiddle #2

Exercise #3 is a 32nd note drum fill. The 16th note doubles are played on the mid-tom and on the floor tom. So getting the doubles to sound even is the main challenge you'll find within this drum fill. To work around this issue, use the tips we gave you on the free drum lesson on the double stroke roll. Following them will get you playing very consistent sounding doubles in no time.

Single Dragadiddle #3

Exercise #4 is a 32nd note drum fill. The 16th note single and double strokes are played on the snare drum. The 32nd note doubles are performed on the hi-hat on counts 1 and 3, and on the bow of the ride cymbal on counts 2 and 4. The bass drum is played in unison with the first stroke from the 32nd note double strokes.

Single Dragadiddle #4

Once you're able to play the single dragadiddle and the exercises herein accurately, you can move on to further expand your knowledge on the drum rudiments. We encourage you to check the free drum lessons on dragadiddle #1 and the dragadiddle #2 next.