Nine Stroke Roll

Learn To Play The Nine Stroke Roll Drum Rudiment!

Much like the five stroke roll, the nine stroke roll is of great use for the tango and is one of the 26 drum rudiments that naturally alternates within itself. Taking a look at the sheet music below, you can see that the nine stroke roll is comprised of nine strokes – four doubles and one single. The nine stroke roll is basically a seven stroke roll with one extra set of double strokes. Thus, it's imperative you go through the free drum lesson on the seven stroke roll before going any further with this one.

Nine Stroke Roll

In the video, Lionel Duperron teaches you how to play the nine stroke roll on the practice pad as a 32nd note pattern, but applies it to the drum set as a 16th note combination instead. Don't get confused by this. Drum rudiments can be played with whichever note value you feel like using. You can develop this rudiment on the practice pad either as 16th notes or as 32nd notes – your call. Once you're able to play the nine stroke roll pretty accurately, it's time to move on to the drum beats and drum fills below.

Exercise #1 is a 16th note half-time drum beat. The nine stroke roll is broken up between the hi-hat and the snare drum. Start by playing the nine stroke roll on the hi-hat from count 1 to count 3. When that feels comfortable to you, move the ninth stroke to the snare drum and play a unison stroke between the hi-tom and the floor tom on count 4. The bass drum pattern is played on all quarter notes.

Nine Stroke Roll #1

Exercise #2 is another 16th note half-time drum beat. The doubles are broken up between the bow of the ride cymbal and the closed hi-hat on counts 1 and 2. After the snare shot on count 3, play an alternating 8th note pattern between the ride and the hi-hat. Practice the hand pattern first; add the bass drum on all quarter notes later on.

The bass drum patterns are kept fairly simple in some of the drum beats on these free drum lessons on the drum rudiments. Mess around with different bass drum patterns after you've mastered the exercises as written.

Nine Stroke Roll #2

Exercise #3 is a 16th note drum fill. The first and third sets of doubles of the nine stroke roll are kept on the floor tom, while the second and forth sets are placed on the mid-tom. The single stroke is played on the snare drum on count 3.

Nine Stroke Roll #3

Exercise #4 looks like a 16th note half-bar drum fill, but it's actually a one bar drum fill that has rests on the first two counts. The first eight notes on the nine stroke roll are played between count 3 and the "ah" of count 4. The ninth stroke is actually played as a unison stroke between the bass drum and a crash cymbal on the first count of the next bar of music.

Nine Stroke Roll #4

Once you're able to play the nine stroke roll and the exercises herein accurately, you can keep challenging yourself by practicing the nine stroke roll with the single stroke placed at the beginning of the rudiment instead of at the end. If you'd rather learn how to play new drum rudiments, check the free drum lessons on the ten stroke roll and the eleven stroke roll instead.