Double Drag Tap

Learn To Play The Double Drag Tap Drum Rudiment!

The sticking pattern for the double drag tap incorporates an offset triple stroke roll played as 8th note triplets. The triple stroke roll is offset by two triplets, starting on the "let" of count 1. You can see this by removing the grace notes from the sheet music below. Thus, learning how to play the drag ruff and the triple stroke roll drum rudiments will do wonders for your double drag taps.

Double Drag Tap

Exercise #1 is an 8th note triplet drum beat. The double drag taps are scattered between the snare drum and the hi-hat. The drags are kept on the hi-hat while the taps are played on the snare drum on counts 2 and 4, and on the hi-hat on counts 1 and 3. The double drag taps are actually offset by one triplet here; they are started on the "trip" of each count instead of on the quarter notes.

Double Drag Tap #1

Drum rudiments are notated with specific note values. However, that doesn't mean you can't play them with other ones. For instance, it's as normal for the single stroke roll to be played as 16th notes as it is to be played as 16th note triplets. With exercise #2 the double drag taps are played as 8th notes instead of as 8th note triplets.
The grace notes on the double drag taps are played on the hi-hat while the primary strokes are moved to the bow of the ride cymbal. Once you have the hands happening, start closing the hi-hat on count 4. Finally, add the bass drum on counts 1 and 3, and on the "and" of count 4.

Double Drag Tap #2

Exercise #3 is a drum fill played in 12/8. The drags on counts 4, 5, 10 and 11 are performed on the snare drum, while on counts 1, 2, 7 and 8 the drags are broken between the hi-hat and the snare drum. The taps on counts 6 and 12 are played between the hi-tom and the floor tom as unison strokes. This is a complicated fill to get up to speed due to the unison strokes on the toms.

Double Drag Tap #3

Exercise #4 is a 12/8 drum fill. The double drag taps are played starting on count 2 – they're offset by one count. Playing the unison figures between the snare drum and the open hi-hat at high tempos is challenging. As is closing the hi-hat at the exact same time as you play the primary strokes of the drags on counts 5 and 11.

Double Drag Tap #4

Once you're able to play the double drag tap and the exercises herein accurately, you can keep challenging yourself by learning how to play a new drum rudiment. We encourage you to check the free drum lesson on the lesson 25 next.